The Curriculum of the Steiner School - Class 7

Notes and Lesson Plans

Not Working with a Chemistry Kit
updated April 9, 2019


This page has helpful links and LOADS of free resources to help you plan your seventh grade year. Enjoy!



Mission Statement - Consulting Services - Lending Library


Not Working with a Chemistry Kit
for Class 8



Pinterest - Renee Schwartz
My curated collection of visuals! Browse sample main lesson book pages, watercolor paintings, chalkboard drawings, etc. for Chemistry.


FREE eBooks at the Online Waldorf Library
Excellent resource! Published Waldorf curriculum books provided here in PDF format for you to download, keep, and read... for free!


Sample Lessons and Free Curriculum


Other Helpful Resources


The Essential Books to Buy


Michael Faraday's The Chemical History of a Candle:
With Guides to Lectures, Teaching Guides & Student Activities

by William S. Hammack

watch the five Faraday lectures at engineerguy.com
*** you can also download this entire book for free as a PDF ***


The Book of Ingeniously Daring Chemistry:
24 Experiments for Young Scientists

by Sean Connolly


The Photographic Card Deck of the Elements:
With Big Beautiful Photographs of All 118 Elements in the Periodic Table

by Theodore Gray

I know this is a deck of cards and not a book, but it's truly essential to this block!


I've been really intimidated by teaching "real" Chemistry (as opposed to the Organic Chemistry: Food & Nutrition block) for years and only attempted it with my third child going through 8th grade.

I don't know if it was the long supply lists full of chemicals or the idea of working with fire or what... but I was pretty freaked out!!

Finally, I bit the bullet and purchased a partially-used chemistry kit, the Thames & Kosmos CHEM C3000, from another Waldorf homeschooling family.


If you want a kit, this really is a great one.

I don't know why, but just knowing that I owned the kit made me feel better and so we very slowly waded our way into Chemistry. Turned out that we didn't even need that kit! I actually had plenty of stuff on hand already, and the more we tried out the activities, the more I began to love this block!

All of a sudden it felt like every interesting thing in our house was Chemistry (slime, soapmaking)... and we had permission to do it all!


Here are my notes about what Becca and I did together. We spread this topic out throughout the second half of the school year -- instead of condensing it into a single main lesson block -- as one strategy for helping me feel less stressed out. The idea of being organized and ready for a month of Chemistry was too overwhelming for me. As always, I hope my honesty is helpful to others!

If you have other suggestions for homeschool Chemistry resources that feel doable, please share.


January


February


March


  • Michael Faraday's The Chemical History of a Candle by Bill Hammack & Don DeCoste
    from engineerguy.com

    NOTE: You can buy this book at Amazon at the link above or download the complete book as a PDF for free on Bill Hammack's website

    • Lecture 3 - Products of Combustion
      YouTube video (15:43)
    • Follow-up to Lecture 3
      Physical Changes: Changes of State activities
      from Michael Faraday's The Chemical History of a Candle (pages 171-175)
      including "Water as liquid & vapor" and "Water as solid, liquid & vapor"


      Pyrex lab equipment: watch glass 150 mm diameter, stirring rod, 600 mL beaker


      glass thermometer in Celsius, -20 to 150°C

    • read "Introduction" and "Chapter 1: Hydrogen" from The Book of Ingeniously Daring Chemistry by Sean Connolly, do "Experiment 1: Get to Know an Atom" on page 8

    • read "Chapter 2: Helium" from The Book of Ingeniously Daring Chemistry by Sean Connolly, do "Experiment 2: Hey, Cool It!" on page 16
    • The Big Ideas of Chemistry: The Particulate Nature of Matter activities
      from Michael Faraday's The Chemical History of a Candle (pages 125-134)
      including "Helping students 'see' atoms in everyday life," "Relationship of motion to temperature," "Physical changes versus chemical changes," and "Cohesion & adhesion: Intermolecular attraction"
    • Molecules are "Sticky" activities
      from Michael Faraday's The Chemical History of a Candle (pages 161-169)
      including "How many drops of H2O can fit on a penny?," "Hanging drops of water," "Moving water," and "Water vs. alcohol: which is 'stickier'?" as well as the "Water down a string demo" from the Teacher's Guide

      Instead of taping wax paper to a piece of cardboard, Becca came up with the idea of opening up, flattening, and using the inside of a 1/2 gallon juice carton. Nice job!

    • do Solids and Liquids experiments from Awesome Physics Experiments for Kids by Erica l. Colón

      • "Mini Snack Bag: What happens when you heat an empty chip bag?" on page 39
      • "Sneaky Surface: How does water defy the laws of gravity when turned upside down in an open jar?" on page 42

        We used the Animals jar from the Waseca Biomes Parts of the Biome Jars.

      • "Egg-Streme Foam: How can you make instant foam from egg whites?" on page 44
    • read "Chapter 3: Boron" from The Book of Ingeniously Daring Chemistry by Sean Connolly, do "Experiment 3: A Star is Boron" on page 26, read Chapter 1 of Secrets of Slime Recipe Book: 30 Projects for Stretchable, Squishy, Sensory Fun! by Jackie Houston and look at how and why she makes all of her recipes borax-powder free, choose a slime recipe and try it

      Becca chose

        Toxic Waste Slime, page 21

        Jelly Cube Slime, page 29

        Gooey Water Bead Slime, page 39

        Chalkboard Slime, page 47

    • read "Chapter 4: Carbon" from The Book of Ingeniously Daring Chemistry by Sean Connolly, look at The Carbon Cycle in the Waseca Biomes material, use Theodore Gray's The Photographic Card Deck of the Elements to lay out the entire periodic table (in a fun nod to page 37, leave out the element Germanium initially)

    • read "Chapter 5: Nitrogen" from The Book of Ingeniously Daring Chemistry by Sean Connolly, look at The Nitrogen Cycle in the Waseca Biomes material, watch the TED talk A Simple Solution to the Coming Phosphorus Crisis by Mohamed Hijri (13:38)

      Note: I've also made the materials for this feltboard lesson on the Nitrogen cycle and it is fun to sew and so wonderfully hands-on!

    • read "Chapter 6: Oxygen" from The Book of Ingeniously Daring Chemistry by Sean Connolly, do "Experiment 6: Global Cooling" on page 60, do "Experiment 7: On the Trail of Cavendish" on page 64
    • Observations of a Candle activities
      from Michael Faraday's The Chemical History of a Candle
      "Questions & experiments" (pages 143-146)

      • What happens if you cover the lit candle with a glass?
      • Try this again, but before the flame goes out, lift the glass. What happens?
      • What happens if you put two lit candles under the glass? Do they both go out at the same time? Do they go out more quickly, less quickly, or in the same amount of time as one candle? Does it matter if one candle is taller than the other?
      • What happens if you cover the flame to put it out, relight, and then cover it with the same glass? Is it different if you use a fresh glass? Have the students cover a flame with a glass, let the flame go out, and then take off the glass and place it mouth side down on the table. Relight, and recover with the glass. See what happens to the time it takes to go out as you continue to do this.
      • Does the size of the glass affect how long it takes for a candle to go out?
      • If you are willing and able, students will most likely want to replicate what Faraday discusses and try to blow out the flame and try to re-light it by igniting the smoke.


April


May



Affiliate links through Amazon cover domain registration, web hosting, and website backup fees. This allows me to offer
my materials for free. Any extra revenue is used as our homeschool budget for the month. Thank you for your support!

Waldorf Curriculum Copyright ©2006-2019